It’s just a matter of time before it’s official, and Barack Obama becomes the Democratic nominee for President of the United States.

Obama takes superdelegate lead on eve of expected loss –

(CNN) — Sen. Barack Obama took the lead in the race for superdelegates on the eve of a contest that’s expected to fall easily into Sen. Hillary Clinton’s column.

Rep. Tom Allen of Maine, Dolly Strazar of Hawaii, Sen. Daniel Akaka of Hawaii and Keith Roark of Idaho all endorsed Obama Monday, giving him a lead of four superdelegates for the time being.

Obama and Clinton face off Tuesday in West Virginia, where polls show Clinton ahead by more than a 40-point margin.

Under pressure from some to withdraw from the race, Clinton insists that West Virginina, where only 28 delegates are at stake, is a key state in the fight for the White House.

She said again Monday that no Democratic candidate since 1916 has gone on to win the White House without first winning West Virginia.

“West Virginia is making a decision that has far-reaching consequences to send a message to people what you expect from your next president,” she said at a stop in Clear Fork, West Virginia.

Clinton currently trails Obama across all fronts — superdelegates, pledged delegates and the popular vote, according to CNN’s latest estimates.

I do wonder how 28 delegates, of which Clinton is only going to pick up between 15-20, giving her a slim net gain in overall delegates, constitutes a “key state”, especially considering that in most elections between 1916 and now, the nominee was already determined before West Virginia went to primaries … it’s not difficult to win a state when you’re the only candidate still running.

So the Clinton campaign is expecting a blow-out win in West Virginia by about 40 points … I wonder what it will mean to her campaign if she only wins by 10-15 points (or worse … barely eking out a win, like she did in the much more key state of Indiana).

Time will tell … but tick tock tick tock tick tock.